Coca-Cola, Delta, JPMorganChase and Walmart Decline to Sign Joint Statement Opposing ‘Any Discriminatory Legislation’


The recent news and uproar after Georgia Republicans voted to toughen voting laws after losing Senate seats to Democrats is still making headlines as major corporations are now speaking out against The New York Times and the Washington Post, there were hundreds of U.S. companies and corporate executives who signed a statement that opposed “any discriminatory legislation.”

Some of those corporations include companies like Google, Bank of America, Amazon, United Airlines, Target, Facebook, General Motors, Netflix, MasterCard, and Starbucks. Executives such as Ken Chenault, Ken Frazier, and Warren Buffet.

“Throughout our history, corporations have spoken up on different issues,” Chenault said. “It’s absolutely the responsibility of companies to speak up, particularly on something as fundamental as the right to vote.”

The news isn’t which executives and companies signed the document, but those who weren’t involved in this letter/ad.

Coca-Cola and Delta declined to sign the statement after they spoke out after the law passed. Home Depot also declined to sign and put out a statement on Tuesday that stated “the most appropriate approach for us to take is to continue to underscore our belief that all elections should be accessible, fair, and secure.”

JPMorgan Chase was another company that didn’t sign the statement but put out one of its own, a spokesman for the bank said, “We publicly made our own strong statement last month about the critical importance of every citizen being able to exercise their fundamental right to vote.”

Walmart’s CEO Doug McMillon, who is chairman of the Business Roundtable and declined to sign the letter also stated that “we do want to be clear that we believe broad participation and trust in the election process are vital to its integrity.”

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